Articles for category "Basic research"


13 January 2017 · Basic research · Media Release

Survival Artists in the Antarctic

Moss researcher Hyoungseok Lee in Antarctica. Photo: KOPRI

Improve our understanding of the impact climate change on plant life in the Antarctic is a new research project in the ReskiLab. Biologists Prof. Dr. Ralf Reski from the University of Freiburg, Germany, and Dr. Hyoungseok Lee from the Korea Polar Research Institute KOPRI, South Korea, will join forces to decipher the genome of an Antarctic strain of the moss Sanionia uncinata. In a second step the genome will be compared to the genome of the model moss Physcomitrella patens, which cannot grow in Antarctica. The project will be funded by KOPRI’s “Polar Genomes 101 Project”. “We are excited about this new opportunity and expect new insights into plant adaptation to harsh environmental conditions,” says Reski. Therefore the Rector of the University of Freiburg/Germany, Prof. Dr. Hans-Jochen Schiewer, and the President of the Korea Polar Research Institute KOPRI, Dr. Ho-Il Yoon, have just signed a co-operation agreement on moss research.

media release at the University of Freiburg

Follow link
28 November 2016 · Basic research · Media Release

Biologists Discover Origin of Stomata

Fluorescence microscope image of Physcomitrella moss cells showing two stomata (fluorescing in green) and the chlorophyll of the chloroplasts (fluorescing in red). Photo: Dr. Stefanie Mueller

An international team has discovered a genetic mechanism that is responsible for the development of stomata – microscopic valves on the surface of plants that facilitate the uptake of carbon dioxide and the release of oxygen and water vapor. The researchers discovered this mechanism, which was previously known in flowering plants like Arabidopsis thaliana, in the moss Physcomitrella patens and found similarities between the two, implying that it already existed in the last common ancestor of mosses and flowering plants. The team was led by the biologists Professor Ralf Reski from the University of Freiburg/Germany and Professor David J. Beerling from the University of Sheffield/UK. The results were published in the journal Nature Plants.

media release at the University of Freiburg

Follow link
24 June 2016 · Basic research · Talk

Evo-Devo of early land plants

Ralf Reski is invited speaker at the EMBO Workshop "New model systems for early land plant evolution" in Vienna, Austria.

see EMBO conference website

Follow link
14 April 2016 · Basic research · Media Release

How to get rid of proteins

Scientists of the Reski lab discover substrates for targeted protein degradation. A German team led by the Freiburg-based biologist Professor Ralf Reski has discovered substrates and interaction partners of the so-called N-end rule pathway of protein degradation in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The study is published in the journal Molecular and Cellular Proteomics.

media release at the University of Freiburg

Follow link
25 February 2016 · Basic research · Talk

No sex required

Ralf Reski invited speaker at the 29th Plant Molecular Biology Meeting: "No sex required - a master regulator for apogamy" at Dabinghausen on Thursday, 25 February 2016.

Follow link
18 January 2016 · Basic research · Media Release

No sex required

A German-Israeli team led by the biologists Professor Ralf Reski from Freiburg and Professor Nir Ohad from Tel-Aviv has discovered a gene trigger in the moss Physcomitrella patens which leads to offspring without fertilization. The researchers assume that this mechanism is conserved in evolution and holds the key to answer fundamental questions in biology. The study is published in the journal Nature Plants.

Whole media release at the University of Freiburg

Follow link
15 October 2014 · Basic research · In the Media

Tough as Old Moss

Credit resilience to environmental change for its longevity. The American Scholar reports about the Publication in the Journal New Phytologist in which members of the ReskiLab show that orphan genes in Physcomitrella patens may be related to cold acclimation.

read more in the The American Scholar

Follow link
15 September 2014 · Basic research · Media Release

Mosses survive climate catastrophes

German scientists discover why these plants endured ice ages.

read whole text at the University of Freiburg website

Follow link
05 August 2013 · Basic research · Media Release

Moss beats Human

A group of German, Belgian and Japanese scientists, coordinated by Professor Ralf Reski from the University of Freiburg, Germany, published a new study in the journal BMC Genomics where they describe 32,275 protein-encoding genes from the moss Physcomitrella patens. This is about 10,000 genes more than the human genome contains.

read whole text at the University of Freiburg website

Follow link
04 July 2013 · Applied research · Basic research · Media Release

Freiburg and Strasbourg join forces

Joint research groups of Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) and University of Strasbourg Institute for Advanced Study (USIAS).

Follow link
Applied research · Basic research

Bryotechnology Image Gallery

The Bryotechnology Image Gallery is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC BY-SA 3.0)

see all bryotechnology images:

Read more
Applied research · Basic research

International Moss Stock Center (IMSC)

The IMSC offers research institutions, industrial enterprises and other facilities the possibility to store back-up moss samples in its cryobank. For researchers, it provides accession numbers of their newly established mutants or newly collected ecotypes to be included into their publications.

The IMSC is developed, hosted and managed by the ReskiLab and collects, preserves and distributes moss mutants, transgenic lines and ecotypes.

Follow link
08 January 2010 · Basic research · Media Release

Micro RNAs make Genes shut up

German Researchers have discovered a Novel Mechanism for Gene Regulation - Publication in the journal Cell.

read whole text at the University of Freiburg website

Follow link
13 December 2007 · Basic research · Media Release

How plants conquered the land

Biologists at University of Freiburg play a leading role in deciphering the moss genome.

read whole text of University of Freiburg 

Download
28 October 2004 · Basic research

The Physcomitrella genome will be shotgun sequenced by the JGI

JGI (Joint Genome Institute)

Follow link
26 August 2004 · Basic research · Media Release

Moss genome sequencing granted

The Washington University in St. Louis reports about the genome sequencing in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

more at Washington University in St. Louis website

Follow link
10 September 2003 · Basic research

BLAST the moss transcriptome available

BLAST the moss transcriptome: at www.cosmoss.org/bm

Follow link
09 September 2003 · Basic research

Moss bioinformatics resource COSMOSS

The moss bioinformatics resource is available at www.cosmoss.org delivered by the ReskiLab.

Follow link
Applied research · Basic research

Cosmoss.org

The model organism database cosmoss.org was launched in 2003 and has been serving as the central knowledge and data base throughout the genome annotation history of Physcomitrella patens. Ever since its launch cosmoss.org has aimed for continuous integration of published data from public repositories and collaborators around the world, including important milestones such as the first draft genome, the genetic map and the complete history of genome annotations from the very first (V1.0) to the most recent version (V3.3).

As such an essential repository it provides newcomers with a single, primary interface to explore the features of this flagship plant genome. At the same time, it provides the established scientific community with an up-to-date resource for comparative analyses. Key features include an integrative genome browser, collaborative annotation tools and a wiki as the central documentation platform.

Cosmoss.org was initially funded by the German Research Foundation DFG and is hosted, maintained and constantly improved by the Chair of Plant Biotechnology at the University of Freiburg, Germany.

Follow link